Tools

Semantic Components and Custom Lint Rules for Improving the A11y Mindset

Gaurav Gupta (he/him)

A lot of eslint rules and reusable components already exist for accessibility in HTML, Javascript and React. When working with developers with varying levels of theoretical and practical experience with accessibility implementations, we realised that the mistakes that our devs were making with respect to accessible implementations, were either not general enough to have an existing eslint rule and / or the mitigation was very specific to the usages in our codebase. We started with a simple thought: can we automate the detection and fixes for these repeated mistakes? This led to creation of codebase / team specific a11y aslant rules and Semantic components. This talk will give an overview of how to build this thought process with examples, and how it can possibly help your team.

Read more about Semantic Components and Custom Lint Rules for Improving the A11y Mindset


Benchmark your accessibility and usability testing with the Accessibility Usability Scale (AUS)

Jennifer Chadwick (she/her) and Elana Chapman (she/her)

How do you know if your website or app is accessible? If you're testing with users of assistive technology (AT) and people with disabilities, this gives you real-life experiences that lead to design improvements. But how do you quantify these results? This presentation will explore why a new measurement tool was needed to effectively capture assistive technology user experiences.

Read more about Benchmark your accessibility and usability testing with the Accessibility Usability Scale (AUS)


Accessibility First Thinking for Developers

GrahamTheDev (he/him)

What if you started every discussion with, 'how do we make this accessible.' What if every decision for a product was thought of from a point of maximum inclusion?

Read more about Accessibility First Thinking for Developers


Do you speak Accessibility? - A look at accessibility hurdles for language learning and linguistics

Florian Beijers (he/him)

One would think that language has been solved in 2023. We have translation apps, sign languages, an international phonetic alphabet that is supposed to be able to represent any sound in any language for academics to endlessly discuss over. And yet, the challenges are myriad. From screen readers not knowing how to pronounce the ultimate guide to pronouncing things to less than helpful apps and from several different alphabets to unhelpful, incorrect language tagging, the topic of linguistics accessibility can be a wonderfully twisty-turny rabbit hole to go down. For the last few years I've been looking into this, and I have learned loads of different things. This talk aims to take the audience through some of those learnings.

Read more about Do you speak Accessibility? - A look at accessibility hurdles for language learning and linguistics


Shifting Left: How CMS accessibility Can Help

Hidde de Vries (he/him)

When it comes to web accessibility, timing is of the essence. It's easier when you do it earlier. What if your CMS could spot content problems and help you fix them, before your content even goes live? What if it could warn content editors about potential issues, ship with accessible defaults, make it easier to see content structure implications and offer alternatives to inaccessible content (like colours with better contrast). In Hidde's talk, you'll learn how these kinds of features can help you 'shift left'.

Read more about Shifting Left: How CMS accessibility Can Help